ZincFive accelerates investment in U.S. Manufacturing

 ZincFive, the world leader in nickel-zinc (NiZn) battery-based solutions for immediate power applications, has secured financing to accelerate its expansion plans in the United States for battery manufacturing, systems assembly, pack assembly, and new product development. The increasing demand for data center infrastructure in the U.S., driven by massive market investments in AI growth, is driving the expansion. The new facility will be located near the company headquarters in Tualatin, Oregon.

The project encompasses dedicated operations for the launch of U.S. battery manufacturing, including the development of the U.S. battery supply chain along with partnerships for critical materials and battery recycling. Not only does this step bolster the local economy, but it also directly meets the pressing demands of global customers focused on strengthening their companies’ supply chain resiliency and capacity. In addition to its existing operations in Asia, this strategic investment by ZincFive signals the company’s commitment to expanding its manufacturing capability, ensuring a global presence to meet the evolving needs of its customers.

“We’re thrilled to launch our U.S. manufacturing journey, serving customers both domestically and internationally,” stated Tim Hysell, CEO and Co-Founder of ZincFive. “It’s been a long-standing vision—a dedicated commitment to extend our battery manufacturing capabilities to the United States, allowing us to continue providing safe, sustainable battery technology for high-power mission-critical applications worldwide.”

ZincFive is well-positioned for substantial global growth to meet the needs of various sectors, including data center customers, particularly emerging segments such as AI-dedicated data centers. ZincFive’s patented nickel-zinc electrochemistry sets a higher standard for battery technology that not only meets today’s growing power demands but does so safely and sustainably, challenging the dominance of its predecessors, lead-acid and lithiumion batteries.